University of Colorado, Boulder

Ayden Parish is a doctoral candidate at the University of Colorado Boulder. He writes:

My name is Ayden Parish. I’m a voice-hearer as well as a PhD candidate in Linguistics at the University of Colorado Boulder. I’m studying voice-hearing experiences and, in particular, the linguistic aspects of how people relate to their voices. Of particular interest is the ways that people frame the language coming from voices based on their own personal frameworks and experiences. That is, how do people define “language” when their experiences of language are different from the norm?

Participation

Participants must be at least 18 years old and feel confident enough with English to engage in an hour-long interview. No particular diagnosis or medical history is required – all that’s needed is to identify in some sense as a voice-hearer.

If interested, please contact me by email.

Procedure

After contacting me, we would set up a time for an interview over either Zoom, Skype, or Google Meet, depending on your preference. This interview consists of some broad questions regarding your past experiences of hearing voices and your current thoughts and opinions about these experiences. You can skip any questions you’d like. The full interview should last about an hour, depending on how thoroughly you want to answer questions.

This interview will be audio recorded, though video recording is optional. This recording is solely for the sake of creating a transcription, from which all personally identifying information such as names or locations will be omitted, and the raw video data will be deleted within a year of recording, for further privacy.

Research Ethics

This research has been reviewed and approved by the University of Colorado Boulder Institutional Review Board (Protocol Number 21-0011). For additional questions or concerns, they can be contacted by email or on (303) 735-3702.

Contact

If you have any further questions, please email me at ayden.parish@colorado.edu.

Please note that this is an independent research project and not linked to our work at Hearing the Voice, Durham University.

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